Healing Herb Directory

Alphabetical List of Healing Herbs | Eastern Names

Welcome to our growing list of Eastern and Western healing herbs! The herbs below are listed in alphabetical order by their common Eastern names, pin yin names, and the common Western names are included in parenthesis. (Alphabetical list of Western names.) Some herbs are listed multiple times, under different pin yin names. In TCM, some plant parts have unique pin yin names, differentiating the parts because to their differing functions. Oak is an example of an herb with multiple listings for each of its various parts having distinct functions.

Ai Ye (Mugwort)

Ai Ye (Mugwort)

Mugwort has long been used as a healing herb that is used both internally and externally. As “moxa” the herb is burned and passed over the portion or area of the body needing to be healed or tonified. Read more…

An Shu (Eucalyptus Tree)

An Shu (Eucalyptus Tree)

Eucalyptus can be used as an insect repellant, an expectorant, and a mouthwash. Used by the Aborigines to heal wounds it is also a tree that has been used to transform swampy environments infested with malaria into habitable neighborhoods. Read more…

Bearberry / Uva Ursi (Xiong Guo)

An Xi Xiang (Benzoinum)

Benzoinum is most frequently used in China to revive the unconscious, ease delirium and assist those suffering from post-partum comas. It is also used to treat chronic lung diseases with phlegm blocking the air passages, making breathing difficult. The essential oil is commonly used to relieve the aches and pains of rheumatism and arthritis. Benzoin swabsticks are commonly used in hospitals to help prevent infection and heal mouth sores. Read more…

Healing Herb Fact Sheets

Healing Herb Fact Sheets

FREE! Each week, we publish a new healing herb. Sign up to receive notices and get them as soon as they are released. Sign Up…

An Ye (Eucalyptus Leaves)

An Ye (Eucalyptus Leaves)

Eucalyptus can be used as an insect repellant, an expectorant, and a mouthwash. Used by the Aborigines to heal wounds it is also a tree that has been used to transform swampy environments infested with malaria into habitable neighborhoods. Read more…

Bai Dou Kou (Black Cardamon)

Bai Dou Kou (Black Cardamon)

A beautiful flower, well known as a garden varietal, and in China, it is also full of symbolic meaning and legendary healing capabilities. Read more…

Bai Gou (Ginkgo Nuts/Seeds)

Bai Gou (Ginkgo Nuts/Seeds)

Ginkgo is one of the best examples of a living fossil. The plant originated over 270 million years ago and has been cultivated in China since at least 2600 BC. Ginkgo is famous for helping with conditions that result in poor memory or conditions of dementia due to poor blood circulation. Read more…

Bai Gou Ye (Ginkgo Leaves)

Bai Gou Ye (Ginkgo Leaves)

Ginkgo is one of the best examples of a living fossil. The plant originated over 270 million years ago and has been cultivated in China since at least 2600 BC. Ginkgo is famous for helping with conditions that result in poor memory or conditions of dementia due to poor blood circulation. Read more…

Bai Li Xiang (Thyme)

Bai Li Xiang (Thyme)

As a food, incense, and medicine for the mind, body and spirit, thyme has a long ancient and magical history. Fresh thyme has one of the highest antioxidant levels among herbs and is often used as an ornamental plant in gardens. Read more…

Bai Shao (Peony)

Bai Shao (Peony)

One of the oldest documented remedies in Traditional Chinese Medicine, this herb’s history includes supporting and healing female complaints while nourishing and/or cooling blood depending on the varietal. Read more…

Pumpkin (Nan Gua, Nan Gua Pi)

Bai Tou Weng (Pulsatilla)

Pulsatilla is known for its ability to help rest and repair the energies of the body. It relaxes the adrenals helping to calm anxiety and soothe the effects of constant stress. It is an excellent herb for anyone feeling truly burnt out, chronically afraid and exhausted. It is an excellent remedy for nervous or stress induced insomnia. Pulsatilla is considered one of the top 50 herbs in Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is popularly used in homeopathy, by Native American peoples and European herbalists. The 35 different species of pulsatilla are all similar in their medicinal uses. Read more…

White Poplar (Bai Yang Zhi)

Bai Yang Zhi (White Poplar)

As a member of the willow family, white poplar also contains the constituent “salicin,” the compound used to make aspirin. White poplar is gentler than aspirin and useful for treating arthritic pain, chronic diarrhea, urinary complaints and menstrual cramping. The bark is known for its anti-inflammatory and pain relieving properties. Read more…

Bai Zhu (Atractylodes)

Bai Zhu (Atractylodes)

Of the two versions of Atractylodis, Bai Zhu (Rhizoma A. Macrocephalae or Ovata) is considered one of the finest Qi tonics available. Used by martial artists to strengthen their legs and muscles this herb is often used in combination with other herbs to help build Qi and balance herbal formulas. In contrast, Cang Zhu (Rhizoma A. chinensis) is very drying and more aromatic. Read more…

Biota Seed (Bai Zi Ren)

Bai Zi Ren (Biota Seed)

Biota seed is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to help calm the mind and open the heart. It is often combined with Wild Asparagus Root (Tian Men Dong) and Reishi (Ling Zhi). It is calming, mildly sedating and helps support digestion. In China, it is associated with long life and vitality. The wood is used in Buddhist temples both for construction work and as incense for burning during ceremonies. Biota seed should not be confused with Biota Leaf (Ce Bai Ye) which is used instead to treat bleeding disorders. Read more…

Ban Bian Lian (Lobelia)

Ban Bian Lian (Lobelia)

Lobelia can help ease a difficult or painful birthing process. It is also well known for treating acute heart conditions, croup, whooping cough and tonsillitis. Too much can be toxic, but in the right amounts it is a wonderful herb with centuries of use by the Chinese and Native Americans. It is said to be the best for treating snake bites and scorpion or wasp stings. The Native American Crow Tribe used it in religious ceremonies. Read more…

Rose (Mei Gui Hua)

Bai Fan (Rice)

The word “Qi” used in Taoism, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Martial Arts, means “life force, energy or breath.” It is derived from the two symbols of air and a bowl of steaming rice. If you want a good, strong life force: Eat rice! There is white, brown, purple, black and reddish colored rices available. Brown rice is whole grain white rice with only the first outer layer or husk removed. White rice is brown rice that has been milled to remove the bran and much of the germ. This reduces the extremely high nutritional value of rice, giving white rice a lower nutritional value than brown rice. The ability of white rice to be easily absorbed by the body is the reason why many healing recipes in Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurvedic Medicine make use of white rice and not brown rice, which can be too difficult for some to digest. Read more…

Pinellia (Ban Xia)

Ban Xia (Pinellia)

The processed root of pinellia is one of the most important and frequently used herbs in Chinese Medicine to help transform phlegm and stop coughing. As the roots are toxic when raw, they are first soaked and often blended with ginger to further relieve any toxic side-effects. In China, pinellia is the primary herb for treating phlegm-damp syndromes including nausea, vomiting, insomnia and bloating. For all its abilities, it is a wonderfully gentle herb, able to treat the young and old alike. Read more…

Wood Sorrel (Cu Jiang Cao)

Betony (Wood Betony)

Wood betony can be enjoyed as a healthy tonic and substitute to black tea. Taken three times a day it can help calm anxiety, relieve nervous headaches and improve your overall health. As a medicine the herb has a long history of being used to treat a wide variety of lung and digestive issues, as well as being recognized as a gentle blood tonic. In Oriental medicine the species Stachys sieboldii is used. This species is sometimes called Chinese or Japanese artichoke. It is not related to artichokes, but is, like wood betony, from the mint family of plants. It also sometimes called “artichoke betony” and has very similar properties. Read more…

Mint (Bo He)

Bo He (Mint)

Mint has long been enjoyed as a tea and food flavoring. It has a long history as an excellent cooling herb that can promote sweating, easing colds and flus as well as aiding headaches, menstrual cramps and other aches and pains. Read more…

Strawberry (Cao Mei)

Cao Mei (Strawberry)

Shaped like a heart, strawberries are not only a delicious fruit, but both varieties (wild and garden) are well known for their antioxidant properties that can help support heart health and regulate blood sugar levels. One whole cup of strawberries contains less than 50 calories. Strawberry leaves are used medicinally to treat fevers, gout, and aid bowel regularity. Read more…

Cang Zhu (Atractylodes)

Cang Zhu (Atractylodes)

Of the two versions of Atractylodis, Bai Zhu (Rhizoma A. Macrocephalae or Ovata) is considered one of the finest Qi tonics available. Used by martial artists to strengthen their legs and muscles this herb is often used in combination with other herbs to help build Qi and balance herbal formulas. In contrast, Cang Zhu (Rhizoma A. chinensis) is very drying and more aromatic. Read more…

Biota Leaf (Ce Bai Ye)

Ce Bai Ye (Biota Leaf)

Biota Leaf (Ce Bai Ye) is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to help stop bleeding disorders including vomiting blood, to coughing up blood, to blood in the stools and urine. Biota wood has been used to build Buddhist temples and the leaves have been dried to use as incense for sacred ceremonies. Don’t confuse Biota Leaf (Ce Bai Ye) with Biota Seed (Bai Tou Weng) which is better used to treat nervous anxiety and not bleeding disorders. Used topically it is useful for treating scalds and burns. Read more…

Burdock (Niu Bang Zi)

Chai Hu (Bupleurum)

Bupleurum is a classic Chinese herb used to address disruptions of the liver and enhance what is called the “free-flow” of Qi (Energy) in the body. It is famous for aiding immunity and helping to ease hot external disorders that are penetrating into the body with signs of chills and fevers, headaches, chest pain and diarrhea. It calms the emotions and is also used to ease menstrual cramps. Read more…

Cicada (Chan Tui)

Chan Tui (Cicada)

Cicada has a long history in China as a symbol of immortality. Its image can be seen on bronze vessels dating back to 1500 B.C. The molt, or outer dried and discarded exoskeleton of the cicada is a common a herb included in many Chinese medical formulas for clearing Wind Heat. The insect itself had no importance, just the discarded shell left behind when it flies away as an adult. It is often used effectively to treat allergy symptoms, childhood convulsions, fevers and the early stages of non-erupted measles. Read more…

Elderberry

Chang Chun Teng (English Ivy)

English ivy is a hardy plant that can live to be a great age. It is a member of the ginseng family and has been used by herbalists in both Europe and Asia since ancient times. It is a different plant than Ground Ivy (Glechoma Hederacea) It is widely used today to treat lung congestion and chronic bronchial conditions. Externally it is used to treat burns, infections, parasites, ulcers, swellings and varicose veins. Read more…

Plantain (Che Qian Zi)

Che Qian Zi (Plantain)

Often considered a weed, plantain is a useful herb for treating indigestion and stomach ulcers. The young leaves are edible and taste a bit like spinach or Swiss chard only bitter. Plantain is an herb that has been popular in Native American cultures, even though it originated from Europe and Asia. Brought to the Americas by early settlers, Native American’s quickly realized the plant’s antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties made it useful for treating a wide variety of ailments and injuries. Both P. major and P. lanceolata have similar medicinal properties, neither are related to the starchy banana-like food that is also commonly called “plantain!” That is a different plant altogether! The Chinese make use of the seeds. Read more…

Chen Pi (Orange Peel)

Chen Pi (Orange Peel)

Oranges bring good luck, are loaded with Vitamin C and the peels are super high in nutrients. There are many different varietals of orange peel, but all of them help build and move Qi (Energy) in the body. They are a powerful and tasty herb often used in combination with other herbs to improve the overall taste of herbal remedies and lend strength to the formula. Read more…

Slippery Elm (Chi Yu)

Chi Yu (Slippery Elm)

Native to North America, slippery elm bark is considered one of the most effective and valuable remedies in Western herbology. The bark’s abundant mucilage is both strengthening and healing, giving the plant a useful broad range of application. It is especially useful for treating lung infections from consumption to bronchitis as it soothes the throat and moistens dry lungs. It has been used in times of famine as a porridge or gruel for small children and the elderly. Read more…

Willowherb (Za Cao)

Chiu Lu Mei (Witch Hazel)

Witch hazel is native to North America and parts of Asia. However, it was the Native Americans who made the best use of the plant’s medicinal qualities and not the Chinese, where it remains mostly enjoyed as a garden ornamental and not as a medicine. Witch hazel is famous for its ability to heal a wide variety of skin ailments, but it can be used internally as well. It is gentle enough to be used alone or in combination with other herbs. Extracts of witch hazel with high herbal content and less alcohol will be the most soothing to use. Witch hazel is used to treat diaper rash, psoriasis, varicose veins, postpartum bleeding and diarrhea. Read more…

Chu Ju (Daisy)

Chu Ju (Daisy)

Considered a weed by some this member of the Asteraceae family can be used as a food, medicine or oracle (he loves me he loves me not). Read more…

Sassafras (Chu Mu, Chu Shu)

Chu Mu, Chu Shu (Sassafras)

All parts of the sassafras tree are used for culinary, medicinal and aromatic purposes. The leaves are crushed and added to Louisiana Creole cuisine. Considered a blood purifier, it has been used for many centuries by the Native Americans and Southeast Asians to heal wounds and ease joint pain. Read more…

Chuan Xiong (Ligusticum)

Chuan Xiong (Ligusticum)

Long used by the Chinese as a medicinal herb it is also used in cooking and as fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Not to be confused with Ligusticum sinense or Ligusticum porteri, plants in the same genus with different attributes. Read more…

Elderberry

Ci Wu Jia (Eleuthero)

Eleuthero (aka Siberian ginseng) is listed in the ancient Chinese herbal text, “The Divine Husbandman’s Classic of Materia Medica” written over 2,000 years ago. However, it was not really appreciated in the West until Russian research confirmed its healing abilities. The word “adaptogen” was coined by a Russian scientist to specifically describe this herbs properties. Eleuthero (aka Siberian Ginseng) remains to this day one of the best adaptogenic herbs available. Adaptogens are herbs that enhance the immune system, build strength, and promote overall health. It has long been used in Oriental herbal formulas. Read more…

Comfrey (Comfrey)

Comfrey (Comfrey)

Comfrey has a long history due to its ability to heal internal and external wounds. Traditionally, it has been used to heal wounds, sprains, and broken bones. Today, it is mostly used externally due to the presence of a toxic alkaloid. This alkaloid can seriously harm the liver if used in large does or incorrectly. Used externally, it is a wonderful herb for healing bones, hence the common name “Knitbone” or “Boneset.” Comfrey has been used by peasants and gypsies as a healing herb and a spring tonic to feed horses. It is an important plant in organic gardening for its ability to condition soils. Read more…

Green Onion (Cong Bai)

Cong Bai (Green Onion)

Scallions, also called green onions, are used the world over to treat colds and help heal abscesses. Highly nutritious they contain a high level of Vitamin K which is known to decrease the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Read more…

Garden Sorrel (Cu Jiang Cao)

Cu Jiang Cao (Garden Sorrel)

The name “sorrel” is used to describe several related plants, including “wild sorrel” and “French sorrel.” The plant has a long history of treating scurvy and kidney stones. Though large doses (500 grams or more) may cause kidney stones. It is popularly used in salads, sauces, stews and soups for its lemony flavor and high Vitamin C and Vitamin A content. It is also good for treating cold sores and febrile diseases. In China, they make use Oxalis corniculata which is also called sorrel, or Indian sorrel, but it is in fact a different plant from the Rumex family and is not a member of the Oxalis family of sorrels. Read more…

Wood Sorrel (Cu Jiang Cao)

Cu Jiang Cao (Wood Sorrel)

Wood sorrel (Oxalis acetosela) is a different plant from either garden or French sorrel (Rumex acetosa). Wood sorrel is in the family Oxalidaceae, which includes over 900 species of plants. An edible plant, wood sorrel has also been popularly used as a seasoning, in salads, soups and sauces. Wood sorrel is known for quenching thirst. In fact, it is commonly used to to treat high fevers because it both cools and quenches thirst. As a gargle it can be used to treat mouth sores, ulcers and sore throats. In China, they make use of Oxalis corniculata, which is commonly also called sorrel, or Indian sorrel, and is a member of the same genus as Western wood sorrel. Read more…

Rhubarb (Da Huang)

Da Huang (Rhubarb)

Rhubarb is very low in calories, and super high in nutritional value. The stalks are used in the west as a popular food for pies and jams. In China, the roots have long been used to drain heat and treat pain caused by blood stagnation, including injuries. Rhubarb is wonderful for treating constipation, diarrhea, and high fevers. Read more…

Da Ji (Milk Thistle)

Da Ji (Milk Thistle)

Milk Thistle has a long history in heraldry and as a symbol in art and poetry. It is revered as an outstanding liver medicine, tonic and food. Read more…

Barley (Da Mai)

Da Mai (Barley)

Barley is well known for its anti-cancer and healthy heart attributes. It is a nutritious grain that is a staple in Tibetan cuisine. It is packed with fibers that help improve digestion, it is known as a high-fiber grain. Read more…

Da Suan (Garlic)

Da Suan (Garlic)

A Food, a medicine, a ward against evil spirits, kills parasites and relieves toxicity. This plant is one of the most used, most loved and easily available. Read more…

Barley (Da Mai)

Da Qing Ye (Baptisia / Indigo)

Indigo / Baptisia has long been both a beautiful ornamental garden flower as well as having a history as a being a strong medicinal herb often used to fight difficult feverish and infectious illnesses. Read more…

Dan Shen (Sage)

Dan Shen (Sage)

Sage has been considered one of the top medicinal and culinary herbs for centuries. It is easy to cultivate and has spirit cleansing properties. This herb is a mainstay in many herbal gardens. Read more…

Da Zao (Red Jujubes)

Da Zao (Red Jujubes)

Red jujubes are delicious! They can be eaten raw, added to soups, teas and decotions. They are an excellent herb for counterbalancing herbal remedies that contain strong Yang herbs such as ginseng. In China they have long been revered as an excellent longevity tonic herb. Read more…

Dang Gui (Angelica)

Dang Gui (Angelica)

Since very early times, Angelica or Dang Gui has been viewed as a cure-all, blood purifier, digestive and protector against enchantment and plagues. The Chinese revere it as one of the fundamental herbs aiding female disorders. Due to their aromatic qualities the dried leaves are used in preparing hop bitters. Read more…

Dang Shen (Codonopsis Root)

Dang Shen (Codonopsis Root)

Often used as a gentler alternative to the stronger ginseng, codonopsis has a long history as being an excellent lung, blood, muscle and overall body tonic. Used in China by nursing mothers to increase healthy milk production and for staying strong and healthy. Read more…

Rehmannia (Di Huang)

Di Huang (Rehmannia)

Long considered a longevity herb in Chinese Medicine, rehmannia is recommended for treating anemia, palpations, irregular menses, osteoporosis and lowering blood pressure. It is also a beautiful ornamental garden flower that attracts hummingbirds. Read more…

Di Long (Earthworm)

Di Long (Earthworm)

Earthworms have been used for thousands of years by many cultures all over the world to treat seizures caused by high fevers, prevent anemia post pregnancy and to ease the pain of arthritic joints. Western science has confirmed the worms ability to lower blood pressure and relieve blood stasis caused by fevers. In many cultures, worms are a gourmet delicacy saved for elders and special occasions. Read more…

Clove (Ding Xiang)

Ding Xiang (Clove)

Cloves are aromatic flower buds commonly used as a spice in cooking, but can also be used medicinally. They have been used in Indian Ayurvedic, Chinese and Western herbalism. It is popular as a seasoning with apples, pumpkin pie, rhubarb, meats, curries and marinades. Cloves are often used in warm fall and winter seasonal drinks for their flavor and warming qualities. In Mexican cuisine, they are known as “clavos de olor,” and are often combined with cumin and cinnamon. Only a small amount of cloves are needed as its flavor is strong and pungent. It is associated with love and protection. Read more…

Dou Ban (Watercress)

Dou Ban (Watercress)

Widely used as a leafy green in salads and sandwiches, the high nutritional value of watercress makes it a true “food as medicine” plant. It has superior cleansing and nourishing functions and is a prime anabolic blood builder, restoring every aspect of the blood structurally and functionally. Read more…

Juniper (Du Song Zi)

Du Song Zi (Juniper)

A strong aromatic herb, juniper is considered to ward off witches and has been used for centuries as a Kidney stimulant to help flush out impurities and cystitis. They herb is used to make gin, improve the flavor of meats and as a fragrance in soaps and lotions. Read more…

Eucommia (Du Zhong)

Du Zhong (Eucommia)

Eucommia is a beloved tonic herb in China, used daily to build strength or as a medicine if one is weak. It is most noted for its ability to ease low back pain, knee and ankle pain. This includes difficulty with moving the legs due to deficient conditions. The Chinese note that using the herb for long periods of time will make your body grow light and contribute to the likelihood of longevity. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), it is a primary herb for tonifying Kidney Yang functions. It is known as both a powerful Yang and Jing tonic herb. Known for profoundly supporting the skeletal and endocrine systems, it can bed used to balance Yin and Yang making it useful for either men or woman, young or old. Read more…

Linden (Duan Hua)

Duan Hua (Linden)

The linden tree is said to be the national symbol of Slovenia. In Salvic mythology the tree is sacred and many villages are named for it. German towns often have a linden tree growing in their centers as protection and to provide shade. The plants are famous for their wood, sweet scents, and ability to treat colds and nervous disorders. Read more…

Allspice (Duo Xiang Guo)

Duo Xiang Guo (Allspice)

Widely used in Mexican and Central American cuisines, allspice is a dried “unripe” fruit from the pimento tree that is known for its pain relieving, mood enhancing, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties. It is also a excellent herb for improving digestion and increasing circulation. Read more…

Oregon Grape Root/Mountain Grape (Eleigang Putao)

Eleigang Putao (Oregon Grape Root/Mountain Grape)

Oregon grape root is best known for treating infections and supporting the liver. These two particular strengths give this herb specific abilities with broad applications. The plant is well-known for its strong antibacterial, antimicrobial and anti-fungal properties. For example, it can treat infections that have become resistant to antibiotics (including urinary tract infections and mouth infections) and a wide range of conditions arising from a sluggish liver or liver congestion. It is a classically bitter, bitter herb. While the plant Barberry (Berberis vulgaris) has similar properties, it is in fact an entirely different plant. Oregon grape (Berberis nervosa) is considered the stronger of the two species. Read more…

Saffron (Fan Hong Hua)

Fan Hong Hua (Saffron)

The dried stigmas of the plant produce saffron, the deep auburn colored spice with a sweet flavor. A single thread can flavor a whole meal. Saffron has been used as a dye, perfume, medicine and offering to the gods. It is said to help lift depression and ease the emotions after a shock. It also helps asthma, coughs, clears acne and eases PMS. Read more…

Pinellia (Ban Xia)

Fen Hong He Lan Jiang (Pink and Blue Ginger)

Cultivated for its medicinal and edible properties, it is also grown as an ornamental plant. Pink and blue ginger (Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb.) has the same medicinal properties as black turmeric (Curcuma caesia) though they are different species in the genus Curcuma. Both are mainly used medicinally, most commonly to prevent cancer cells from growing. This herb treats bronchitis, pneumonia, asthma, and pain relief caused by toothaches, osteoarthritis, and stomach disorders. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is in the same genus, but it is a different plant from these two. Read more…

Feng Wang (Honey/Royal Jelly)

Feng Wang (Honey/Royal Jelly)

Considered a food of the saints and a food to nourish the soul and uplift the spirits, honey is also used medicinally to help bind other herbs together into pills and tablets as well as sweeten the taste of very bitter herbs. Royal Jelly, the bitter substance made to feed the queen bee, is so nutritious it is considered to be almost a complete food in itself. Read more…

Bergamot Orange (Fo Shou Gan)

Fo Shou Gan (Bergamot Orange)

Bergamot orange (Citrus aurantium, C. bergamia) is a beautiful plant. It is the ingredient in Earl Grey Tea that gives the tea its particular scent and flavor. Bergamot orange is often confused with the herb, bergamot / bee balm (Monarda fistulosa), as bee balm, with its lemony scent, is often commonly called bergamot too. The rind of the bergamot orange fruit is used to make the well known essential oil called “bergamot oil.” The oil is used to quickly heal wounds, cracked skin, scars, ulcers and eczema. Bergamot essential oil is used to treat convulsions, cramps, promote digestion, and tonify the respiratory, digestive, circulatory, and nervous systems. Read more…

Fu Ling (Poria)

Fu Ling (Poria)

Poria (Fu Ling) is an herb with a long and respected history in China. It is considered one of the premier Yin tonic herbs. Next to Licorice it is the most frequently used herb in Chinese herbalism. It is used to cook with and it is also used as a medicinal herb. Read more…

Barley (Da Mai)

Fu Niu (Barberry)

Barberry has been used in Asia, Europe, India, and the Mediterranean for over 2500 years to treat a wide variety of health issues ranging from digestive disorders, diarrhea, plague, heart issues and liver complaints. Used externally, it helps treat psoriasis and skin irritations.. Read more…

Fu Pen Zi (Raspberry)

Fu Pen Zi (Raspberry)

Raspberry leaf is well known for its benefits during pregnancy, but it is also beneficial for women of all ages and stages of life. Raspberries are known for their antioxidant and high vitamin C levels. Native Americans used raspberry’s as a medicine and for its protective properties. Raspberry leaves make a wonderful gargle and help heal wounds and varicose veins. Read more…

Gan Cao (Licorice)

Gan Cao (Licorice)

You say Licorice and I say Liquorice, either way this herb has a history of being used the world over as a medicine, flavoring, confection and liquer. The Chinese consider it one of the major life force tonifying herbs as well as uniquely able to treat and enter all twelve meridians. Read more…

Ginseng

Ginseng (Ginseng)

Korean, Chinese, American and Siberian Ginseng. Each similar yet unique. Considered the “King Herb” in Traiditional Chinese Medicine the herb has an ancient history as a Taoist healing herb for the mind, body and spirit. Read more…

Goldenseal

Goldenseal (Goldenseal)

Goldenseal is often used in herbal formulas to boost the medicinal effects of other herbs. It is famous for its antimicrobial properties that make it an excellent choice for fighting colds, allergies, and lung congestion. It has been used extensively by the Native American Indians, who taught the early American settlers how to use it. Read more…

Gou Qi Zi (Lycium – Goji)

Gou Qi Zi (Lycium – Goji)

Chinese legends claim that a Taoist monk lived to be 252 years old by including lycium berries in his daily tonic. Famous for aiding a long, healthy life and longevity, lycium is also known as an excellent blood tonic. Read more…

Turkey (Huo Ji)

Gua Lou (Trichosanthes)

Both the fruit and the powdered root of trichosanthes have similar properties. The plant is famous for treating what is called “wasting and thirsting disorder,” an ancient reference in Oriental medicine for diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis. It also is used to treat angina pectoris and has become well-known for its anticancer activity, specifically for treating lung cancer. Read more…

Guan Ye Lian Qiao (St. John’s Wort)

Guan Ye Lian Qiao (St. John’s Wort)

St. John’s Wort is a yellow flower that can lift your spirits and help stop bleeding. It can be used with other herbs to help detox the liver but it is best known for relieving stress, depression and anxiety. Read more…

Boneset (Guan Ye Zelan)

Guan Ye Zelan (Boneset)

Native to North America, boneset was a popular healing plant used by Native Americans. Do not confuse boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) with the purple flowered plant also commonly called “boneset” or “gravel root” (Eupatorium purpureum) or with the herb comfrey (Symphytum officinale), also commonly called “boneset” for its ability to heal broken bones, these are all different plants. This boneset, Eupatorium perfoliatum, is famous for treating all kinds of fevers and easing muscle aches. Until aspirin was discovered, this boneset was the herb of choice for fighting fevers and its symptoms. Read more…

Silver

Hai Ma (Seahorse)

Dried seahorses (also written as sea-horses) have a long history of being used medicinally in Oriental medicine. They are used whole or powdered. They are extremely popular as a male aphrodisiac and for promoting Kidney Yang, which is known for supporting fertility, immunity and general strength. Seahorses are a bestselling tonic in China, used by middle aged couples to “spice things up” in their sex life. Read more…

Black Pepper (Hei Hu Jiao)

Hei Hu Jiao (Black Pepper)

Black pepper stimulates the taste buds sending a message to the stomach to increase its hydrochloric acid secretions which improve the digestion of proteins and other food components. This increase in digestive activity also ensures that food is properly digested prior to arriving in the intestines, where undigested food can become food for unwanted bacterial growth and cause constipation or diarrhea. Black pepper helps stimulate the breakdown of fat cells and helps prevent atherosclerosis. Read more…

Hei Mei (Blackberry)

Hei Mei (Blackberry)

Edible and medicinal, the blackberry has been used by Native American’s and Western Europeans for centuries. It has a long history of healing female disorders and being used in spells for protection from ghosts and vampires. Used in syrups, liqueurs, teas and pies, blackberry leaves are cooling and the roots are astringent. Often used to treat sore throats, diarrhea and wounds. The leaves were often used to wash wounds and help stop them from excess bleeding. Read more…

Yew (Hong Dou Shan)

Hong Dou Shan (Yew)

Yew leaves, berries and seeds are all highly poisonous and deadly. If any are ingested, they should be promptly removed by emesis after which milk and bland drinks may be administered. The chemical paclitaxel, found in the bark of the Pacific yew (T. brevifolia) and the Chinese yew (T. chinensis), is extracted to effectively fight breast and late stage ovarian cancers. As an incense, yew has long been used in ceremonies to protect and contact ancestors and the dead and to assist astral travel between the spirit worlds. As a homeopathic remedy, yew is used to treat neuralgia, rheumatism, and heart and kidney ailments. Read more…

Hong Hua Pi (Birch)

Hong Hua Pi (Birch)

The birch tree is rich in medicinal, magical and practical history. It has been used since very ancient times by many cultures and peoples for everything from writing and building to magic and disinfecting. Birch is used to clean and irrigate the urinary tract and purify the blood. Read more…

Hong Shan Shu (Red Cedar)

Hong Shan Shu (Red Cedar)

While similar to Cedar, Red Cedar is a different plant indigenous to the Pacific Northwest with a long history of medicinal, spiritual, and practical uses by the Native American tribes living in these areas. Red Cedar is in fact a variety of cypress tree. The healing properties are essentially the same as cedar’s. Read more…

Rue (Hou Hui)

Hou Hui (Rue)

Rue is one of the oldest English gardening plants used for medicine. At one time holy water was sprinkled from brushes made of rue, giving it the name of the Herb of Repentance and the Herb of Grace. From earliest times rue has been used to protect against contagious diseases and infestations of fleas and other insects. The herbs disagreeable odor and bitter taste are only noticed in large doses. In small doses it is eaten as a food, used as a flavoring and has traditionally been a very popular medicine. Read more…

Hou Ma Ren (Cannabis)

Hou Ma Ren (Cannabis)

The use of Cannabis (AKA Marijuana) by many of the world’s cultures to heal the mind and body dates back to ancient times. Here we explore that Eastern and Western history as well as the current usages of this important medicinal herb. Read more…

Hou Po (Magnolia Tree)

Hou Po (Magnolia Tree)

The bark and roots of the magnolia tree have a long tradition in Chinese Medicine for healing and calming upset stomachs, asthma, and vomiting. See magnolia flower for the functions of the flowers and buds. Read more…

Hou Po Hua (Magnolia Flower)

Hou Po Hua (Magnolia Flower)

Magnolia flowers and buds have a long tradition in Chinese Medicine for treating nasal congestion, whitening skin and calming toothaches. Read more…

Hu Die Hua (Iris)

Hu Die Hua (Iris)

Iris cultivation has produced many varieties of species. It is the Flag Irises that are known for their medicinal properties. They are also known as a blood and liver cleansing herb that has been used as a cure-all by Native Americans for centuries. Read more…

Turkey (Huo Ji)

Huo Ji (Turkey)

Turkey is low fat, high protein and highly nutritious. It will enhance your immunity, help you sleep, and build strength. Turkey is safe to eat for those suffering from irritable bowel syndrome. It is scared to the Mayans, Aztecs and Toltecs. Read more…

Mistletoe (Hu Ji Sheng)

Hu Ji Sheng (Mistletoe)

Known for aiding epilepsy and other convulsive nervous disorders, mistletoe effectively numbs nerve action to distal parts of the body away from the main organ that may be causing the problem, and it is in this way that it aids with convulsions and epilepsy. Ancient traditions suggest the mistletoe be kissed when touched or stepped under. Read more…

Hu Tao Ren (Walnut)

Hu Tao Ren (Walnut)

The Walnut Tree’s history and use as a medicine, food and protector of the spirit dates back through antiquity with almost all cultures using it’s wood to build with, and her nuts, shell husk, leaves, bark and even the spirit of the tree itself to ward off evil, illness, and hunger. Read more…

Cilantro (Hu Sui Ye)/Coriander (Xiang Cai)

Hu Sui Ye (Cilantro)/Xiang Cai (Coriander)

In the west, the plant is called cilantro and the seeds are known as coriander. Cilantro looks like parsley but has a more citrus flavor and the seeds are have a warm nutty flavor. Both are used in cooking and both have important medicinal properties. Cilantro and coriander seeds are full of phytonutrients, flavonoids, essential oils and phenolic compounds that can help not only treat a wide variety of digestive issues, but also smallpox, diabetes, menstrual cramping, and anemia. Cilantro significantly helps clear the body of heavy metal toxicity. Read more…

Hua Mu Pi (Birch)

Hua Mu Pi (Birch)

The birch tree is rich in medicinal, magical and practical history. It has been used since very ancient times by many cultures and peoples for everything from writing and building to magic and disinfecting. Birch is used to clean and irrigate the urinary tract and purify the blood. Read more…

Hua Shi (Talcum Powder)

Hua Shi (Talcum Powder)

Talcum powder is most famous as a lubricant that can help sooth and prevent hot oozing skin conditions such as diaper rash and oozing eczema. In China, talc also has a long history of being used to treat difficult stuck and painful urination and watery diarrhea. Talc is known for being a soft creamy mineral that is the softest mineral on earth. Read more…

Huang Chu Ju (Chamomile)

Huang Chu Ju (Chamomile)

Chamomile is documented as being one of the most popular teas sold in the U.S. and Europe. It is a gentle but highly effective herb famous as a cure-all but best known for soothing digestion, aiding sleep and helping to sooth skin rashes and bruises. This herb is often used in magical formulas to help protect the body, mind and spirit from negative energies and forces. The flowers can be both warming and cooling. Read more…

Phellodendron (Huang Bai)

Huang Bai (Phellodendron)

Don’t confuse the herb phellodendron (Phellodendron amurense) with philodendron (Philodendron), an ornamental indoor and common house plant! While the names are similar the plants are entirely different. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, phellodendron, or Huang Bai, is considered one of the top 50 herbs used for healing. It is especially noted for its ability to clear heat and toxins from the body, including eliminating damp-heat from the bladder and kidneys. Read more…

Cucumber (Huang Gua)

Huang Gua (Cucumber)

One large peeled cucumber contains only 34 calories. They are an excellent source for vitamin C and K and are known to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. They are also detoxing and anti-aging. Pickled, raw or baked, cucumbers are an excellent addition to a healthy diet. Botanically speaking, like tomatoes and squash, cucumbers are actually a fruit, not a vegetable, even though we tend to refer to them as a vegetable. Read more…

Goldenrod (Huang Hua)

Huang Hua (Goldenrod)

Goldenrod is used to reduce pain and swelling. It is often used in Europe to treat bladder and kidney problems. It is also famous for its ability to treat allergies, skin problems and cardiovascular issues. Using goldenrod in the winter can help build a person’s immunity to prevent flu and in preparation for the spring and summer season of allergies. Read more…

Cowslip (Huang Hua Jiu Lun Cao)

Huang Hua Jiu Lun Cao (Cowslip)

Cowslip flowers have been added to vinegars and used to make wine and syrups. The plant is best known for its sedating properties and as an expectorant that is useful for treating phelgmy coughs and asthma. Safe for children, the herb is used to calm hyperactivity and help young people sleep. The plant is famous for its restorative and soothing properties. The roots are excellent at loosening old stuck pheglm associated with chronic bronchial conditions, and arthritic conditions with inflammation and pain. Read more…

Huang Qi (Astragalus)

Huang Qi (Astragalus)

With thousands of species in this genus of herbs and small shrubs, Astragalus has been used by both Eastern and Western cultures as a food, medicine and healer of the spirit. Used by martial artists and monks alike To strengthen muscles, life force and increase stamina. Read more…

Skullcap (Huang Qin, Ban Zhi Lian)

Huang Qin, Ban Zhi Lian (Skullcap)

There are over 300 genus of scutellaria. Here we explore the three most commonly used for medicine by the Chinese, Native Americans and now herbalists the world over. Huang Qin (Scutellaria baicalensis), is a major herb for treating damp-heat in the small intestines with signs of diarrhea, dysentery or urinary dysfunction. Each of the genus discussed here are excellent at treating hot oozing sores. The American plant (S. lateriflora) is considered the mildest and best for treating anxiety. Read more…

Jia Yan Ye (Mullein)

Jia Yan Ye (Mullein)

A wonderful hearty herb. Considered an all around remedy for the lungs. Also excellent for treating boils and urinary dysfunction, hemorrhoids and soothing pain. It’s soft velvety leaves are why it is often called the Velvet Plant. Read more…

Silver

Jiang Can (Silkworm)

Not commonly used in the west, in China, street vendors sell roasted silkworm pupae as a snack. Silkworms have even been proposed for cultivation by astronauts as a space food for long-term missions. Used medicinally, silkworms are used for treating infant convulsions, preventing the signs of aging skin, treating sore throats and are highly effective for treating facial paralysis caused by stroke. Read more…

Jie Gu Mu (Elderberry)

Jie Gu Mu (Elderberry)

Elderberry has a long and distinguished history in Europe and the West as a medicine, beverage and for protecting against evil spirits. Read more…

Burdock (Niu Bang Zi)

Jin Que Hua (Broom)

Decoctions of broom are used to treat kidney and bladder infections. Not to be confused with either Spanish broom (Spartium junceum), a different plant that can be poisonous or butcher’s broom (Ruscus aculeatus), which helps tighten blood vessels and capillaries, broom (Cytisus scoparius) can be used to regulate heart rate and stimulate urination. In fact, its most common use is to reduce excess fluids from the body in cases of congestive heart failure. In Germany, broom is considered gentler and less toxic than the drug quinidine used for treating heart arrhythmias. Read more…

Jin Yin Hua (Honeysuckle)

Jin Yin Hua (Honeysuckle)

Honeysuckle treats asthma and will keep witches from entering your house if you grow it at the entrance to your home. The Chinese also used it to treat snake bites. It is excellent for treating headaches, skin sores, and acute infectious diseases. Read more…

Jin Zhan Ju (Pot Marigold or Calendula)

Jin Zhan Ju (Pot Marigold or Calendula)

Pot Marigolds, also known by their Latin name, calendula, can be used to treat wounds. It is like arnica, only milder and gentler and therefore can even be used on open wounds. This beautiful flower has a long history in India and the West as being sacred and is used in religious ceremonies and rituals. It is a food, a medicine and a wonderful addition to your garden. Read more…

Ju Hua (Chrysanthemum)

Ju Hua (Chrysanthemum)

A beautiful flower, well known as a garden varietal, and in China, it is also full of symbolic meaning and legendary healing capabilities. Read more…

Sassafras (Chu Mu, Chu Shu)

Ju Ye Zong (Saw Palmetto)

Saw Palmetto is probably best known for its ability to relieve the symptoms of an enlarged prostate, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It is also used to treat some prostate infections and even, in combination with other herbs, prostate cancer. Less known is the herbs application for treating colds, bronchitis and sore throats. Read more…

Fern (Jue Lei)

Jue Lei (Fern)

Some ferns are grown for food, and research is being done to learn more about their phenomenal ability to remediate contaminated soils and remove chemical pollutants from the air. Maidenhair ferns, particularly, have a long history of being used as a medicine to expel worms and heal wounds. Read more…

Chicory (Juju Gen)

Juju Gen (Chicory)

Want to cut down your daily caffeine consumption? Ground chicory root may be for you. Not only is the root a coffee substitute but the root, leaves and flowers have a long history for their medicinal properties as well. Chicory is used as a liver tonic, to moderate your heart rate, increase bile production, ease constipation and kill parasites. Read more…

Comfrey (Comfrey)

Kuan Dong Hua (Coltsfoot)

Coltsfoot is full of mucilage, the substance that coats sore throats, making it a popular traditional cough remedy. It has a long history of successfully treating lung ailments and has been generally said to be one of nature’s best herbs for treating a wide variety of lung diseases, including asthma, wheezing and stubborn cases of bronchitis. Even the leaves have been, and are, smoked to help treat coughs. Both Western and Eastern (Traditional Chinese Medicine) regard this herb highly. Read more…

Kun Bu (Kelp)

Kun Bu (Kelp)

Kelp has been celebrated as a food in Asian cultures for centuries. It is recognized in the West for it’s rich supply of iodine, iron, calcium and potassium. All of which make it a wonderful food and medicine. Iodine is critical to the thyroids functions of making sex hormones and metabolizing fats. Read more…

La Gen (Horseradish)

La Gen (Horseradish)

Cultivated since antiquity by cultures the world over the history of this herb ranges from use as a condiment to treating kidney problems, among other things. A culinary herb with medicinal capabilities. Read more…

La Jiao (Cayenne)

La Jiao (Cayenne)

Besides flavoring foods, cayenne is considered wonderful for treating heart and digestive issues. It is an herb that is loved or hated depending on who you talk to because of its strong flavor profile and hot spiciness. Read more…

Lan Zao (Blue-Green Algae)

Lan Zao (Blue-Green Algae)

Blue-green algae / Spirulina changed our Earth forever by their photosynthetic activity that brought the needed oxygen into the environment so new and more-complex organisms, plants and mammals could evolve. It is a highly nutritious food that is loaded with proteins, minerals and vitamins. Read more…

Chestnut (Li Zi)

Li Zi (Chestnut)

With only 69 calories per ounce, chestnuts are lower in calories than other nuts. Almonds, cashews and macadamia nuts contain 160-200 calories per ounce. However, these other nuts contain 4-7 grams of protein and chestnuts only contain 1 gram of protein. Chestnuts are high in potassium, vitamin C, and folate. They help improve digestion, manage diabetes and lower blood pressure. Most of the species possess similar properties, qualities and nutritional values. Chestnuts are considered the “grain that grows on a tree” due to their high carbohydrate and low fat content. The leaves and bark can also be used medicinally. Read more…

Chinese Water Lily (Lian Zi Xin, He Ye, Lian)

Lian Zi Xin, He Ye, Lian (Chinese Water Lily)

Not to be confused with blue lotus (Nymphaea caerulea), the Chinese water lily/lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for thousands of years. It is held sacred by the Buddhists, Hindus and Ancient Egyptians. Lotus can treat coughs, ease menses, and kill and hinder cancer cells associated with lung cancer. All parts of this species of lotus are edible and are common ingredients in many Asian dishes. Lotus is popular for its anti-aging, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The seeds and stamens are primarily used for medicinal purposes rather than foods, even though they are also edible. Read more…

Ling Lan (Lily of the Valley)

Ling Lan (Lily of the Valley)

Lily of the Valley was used medicinally as early as the fourth century. Like the herb foxglove, lily of the valley contains constituents that have a tonic effect on the heart, helping to slow or normalize a weak heartbeat, without putting any extra demand on pulmonary blood supply. Read more…

Reishi (Ling Zhi)

Ling Zhi (Reishi)

Famous for its miraculous health benefits, Reishi contains compounds said to prevent and reduce various cancer tumors. Reishi mushrooms significantly reduce the effects of allergic reactions, including asthma, congestion, contact dermatitis, stiff necks, and conjunctivitis. Read more…

Sugar (Tang)

Liu Huang (Sulfur)

The body uses sulfur to maintain bone and joint health. It is an important component of many amino acids, proteins, vitamins and hormones within the body. It also aids healthy skin and digestion Read more…

Liu Ji Nu (Mugwort)

Liu Ji Nu (Mugwort)

Mugwort has long been used as a healing herb that is used both internally and externally. As “moxa” the herb is burned and passed over the portion or area of the body needing to be healed or tonified. Read more…

Borage (Liu Li Ju)

Liu Li Ju (Borage)

Borage is wonderful plant that has been grown for both its medicinal value and as a wonderful honey. In Europe, it is widely enjoyed as a food and medicine. In the U.S., it is popularly cultivated as an herbal supplement for its high content of GLA (Gamma-linoleic acid), a fatty acid that helps reduce inflammation and dilate blood vessels. The flowers and leaves are edible. Borage helps restore the adrenal glands and we know that Roman soldiers would mix borage tea with wine before a battle to fortify themselves. Read more…

Liu Shu Pi (Willow Tree)

Liu Shu Pi (Willow Tree)

All willow tree species behaves like aspirin and are mainly used to cool and relieve pain. The bark is excellent for treating chronic inflammation, infection and pain. In 1763, Reverend Edward Snow (1702-68) discovered salicin in willow bark. It is the active ingredient now used in asprin. Salix alba,‘Caerulea’ is a specially grown species of willow found in Britain that is used to make bats for playing the game of cricket. Remember, willow tree (Salix alba) is not willowherb (Epilobium augustifolium). Willow bark has been used for thousands of years as an effective treatment for aches, inflammation, fevers and pain. Read more…

Lobelia (Ban Bian Lian)

Lomatium (Lomatium)

This herb is considered a highly effective antimicrobial with a variety of uses. The key is proper identification so as not to confuse it with other similar plants of the same family or the very poisonous hemlock parsley, which is a similar looking plant in the same family of plants. Some species are edible, this variety is famous for treating a wide variety of lung infections including pneumonia and influenza. Read more…

Long Dan Cao (Gentian)

Long Dan Cao (Gentian)

There are many varieties of gentian. In the west, the most commonly used species is yellow gentian (yellow Gentiana). The other varieties have similar properties so they can, and are, also used depending on what is available. There is no better stomach tonic than gentian and it is considered extremely useful in treating jaundice. The Chinese make use of two different species of gentian: Gentiana scabra (Long Dan Cao) and G. macrophylla (Qin Jiao) attributing them with slightly different characteristics. In the west Yellow, Japanese, Autumn, Field, Marsh, Spring, Cross-Leaved and Five-Leaved Gentian are all commonly used interchangeably as they all have similar characteristics. Read more…

Deer Horn Velvet (Lu Rong)

Long Gu (Dragon Bone)

In China, dragons symbolize dignity, strength and the flight of the Spirit (Shen). Dragon bones are the fossilized bones of dinosaurs and woolly mammoths. They are rich in calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate and are used to calm the Spirit (Shen), evict ghosts, sooth nerves, stop dizziness and stop sweating. They bring the best of the ancients to bear on the present by soothing an anxious heart and rattled spirit. It is often eaten raw. Read more…

Tarragon (Long Hao)

Long Hao (Tarragon)

Tarragon, also known as estragon, is famous for its flavor and aromatic properties that make it a popular culinary herb. It can also be used as a tea to help treat insomnia. French tarragon is the variety favored for cooking. The plant’s aromatic qualities are similar to the scent of anise. Chewing the leaves helps relieve mouth or dental pain. The herbs antioxidant properties help neutralize cancer causing free radicals in the body. The World Health Organization recommends tarragon as a first step in treating basic malaria. Read more…

Green Onion (Cong Bai)

Lu Cha(Green Tea)

Green tea, Camellia sinensis, originated in China. Several varieties exist all of which can vary significantly based on growing conditions, methods used to grow the plants, and the processing of the leaves after harvest. Associated with longevity, lowering cholesterol, mental alertness, and helping to prevent cancer, why wouldn’t you enjoy a cup of green tea a day? Read more…

Horseradish

Lu Feng Fang (Hornet’s Nest)

Several species of hornet’s (or wasps) nests are useful for treating a variety of particular ailments, including skin rashes and helping to stop bleeding. In China, the herb has been used successfully to treat a variety of malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, lung diseases, skin ailments and dental diseases.. Read more…

Aloe Vera (Lu Hui)

Lu Hui (Aloe Vera)

Aloe is a genus containing over 500 species of flowering succulent plants. The most commonly known is Aloe vera. It is a cactus-like plant with a long history of being used internally and externally as a medicine to treat wounds and upset stomachs. Studies confirm the plants ability to effectively treat genital herpes, psoriasis, burns, and reduce the incidence of tumors in the liver, bone and spleen by 90%. Read more…

Lu Rong (Deer Horn Velvet)

Lu Rong (Deer Horn Velvet)

Deer Horn Velvet has a long history in China as a longevity herb, a strengthening herb and a male aphrodisiac. It is considered a key herb for tonifying Yang and Kidney deficiencies. Deer remain one of the oldest shamanic references in virtually every culture, as all cultures hunted and used every part of the deer as either food, clothing, medicine, glue, shoes, weapons, and more. Read more…

Luo Le (Basil)

Luo Le (Basil)

Well known as a culinary seasoning, basil also has a deep history as a medicine for the body, mind and spirit. It is considered an emblem of hatred by some and a beneficent spirit by others. Read more…

Luo Shi Teng (Jasmine)

Luo Shi Teng (Jasmine)

Jasmine is a sacred flower with a wonderful scent famed for calming and raising the spirit and healing painful abscesses and hot swellings. Read more…

Pumpkin (Nan Gua, Nan Gua Pi)

Ma Bo (Puffball)

The puffball is a type of mushroom (actually three similar species are typically used together or alone). The mushroom cap and spores are used medicinally and the young puffballs are edible. In Oriental medicine they are commonly used to treat sore throats. They are also effectively used to stop bleeding including nose bleeds, mouth sores, and externally for injuries. Read more…

Poria (Fu Ling)

Ma Chi Xian (Purslane)

Considered a weed in many areas, it can also be eaten as a leaf vegetable and used as a medicine. Eaten raw it is crunchy with a light lemony flavor delicious in salads and sandwiches. It has long been used as food in the Mediterranean region and as a medicine in Traditional Chinese Medicine. In China, it is often described as a longevity herb. Read more…

Man Yue Mei (Cranberry)

Man Yue Mei (Cranberry)

Unsweetened cranberry juice has been used for centuries to help protect the urinary system because it can help fight against bacterial infections in the bladder and urethral mucosa. Cranberry juice turns the urine acidic helping to prevent the formation of alkane stones in the urinary tract. Cranberries have one of the highest oxygen radical absorbent capacities among edible berries, making them an excellent protector from cancer causing free radicals in the body. Cranberries were considered a symbol of peace by the Native American Delaware Tribes. Read more…

Manzanita

Manzanita (Manzanita)

With over a hundred species all native to the Pacific Northwest, Arizona and New Mexico this plant has a long history of providing food, medicine and has been smoked by early American Indians. Read more…

Mao Bo He (Catnip)

Mao Bo He (Catnip)

A gentle edible herb that is ideal for treating children’s fevers, but strong enough to be used by adults. Often used by women to help move a stuck menses. Read more…

Holly (Mao Dong Qing)

Mao Dong Qing (Holly)

European legend says that holly sprang up under the footsteps of Christ, when He trod the earth. European holly is used to treat fevers and digestive problems. In China, the root of the species Illicis pubescentis is used to help treat heart problems, asthma and skin infections. There are several different species of holly, but each exhibit similar properties even while sometimes they are each used a bit differently based on tradition and customs. Read more…

Mao Xu Cao (Java Tea)

Mao Xu Cao (Java Tea)

Java tea has been found to protect the renal and gastrointestinal organs and passage ways. It is also said to help reduce the effects of allergies and asthma. It is most famous for its anti-inflammatory and urinary health benefits, helping to prevent kidney stones. Java tea is also good at relieving stress and fatigue and has strong antioxidant properties that help protect against free-radical damage and the signs of aging. A daily cup of java tea is said to lower cholesterol, increase brain activity and memory as well as increasing overall brain functionality. Read more…

Frankincense (Ru Xiang)

Mao Di Huang (Foxglove)

The leaves of the foxglove plant are used to extract the constituent, digitalis, used to make the pharmaceutical drug, also called Digitalis. Digitalis is used to treat irregular and overly fast heart rates. Foxglove was first written about in Ireland and then Scotland, where it still grows wild, as early as the 13th century. The plant has also been related to witchcraft for centuries. It was used in pagan rituals and potions to break fairy enchantments. Read more…

Mei Gui Hua (Rose)

Mei Gui Hua (Rose)

The Rose was one of the most valued medicinal plants in the monastery gardens of Medieval Europe. Rose petals are very astringent making them excellent for washing skin and bruises. Roses are also classically considered a strong aphrodisiac and anti-depressant. The Persians are credited with the development of rose oil. Read more…

Rose (Mei Gui Hua)

Mi Die Xiang (Rosemary)

Rosemary has a long history of being associated with its ability to improve the memory. Used in both weddings and funerals for this reason, new research has confirmed that the herb does in fact improve brain function, including memory and focus. It is a powerful herb that can be used in a wide variety of ways as a medicine and as a culinary herb. It boosts your immune system, strengthens your liver function and helps fight and prevent lung infections and cancers. Remember to use rosemary! Read more…

Bergamot / Bee Balm (Mi Feng Chun Gao)

Mi Feng Chun Gao (Bergamot / Bee Balm)

Edible and medicinal bergamot, also known as bee balm, is often used to treat skin eruptions, mouth infections, sore throats and gastric disorders. Bergamot, or bee balm (Monarda didyma), is not the source of what is commonly called Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) Essential oil, and is the scent associated with Earl Grey tea. Bergamot (Monarda didyma) AKA Bee Balm, has been used by Native Americans for centuries to treat a wide variety of health disorders. Read more…

Marjoram (Mo Jiao Lan)

Mo Jiao Lan (Marjoram)

Be careful to not confuse marjoram (Origanum majorana) with oregano (Origanum vulgare), which is often commonly called wild marjoram. Botanically they are cousins and closely related, but they are not the same plant. Marjoram is well known as a general cure-all, but is especially useful for treating digestive and cardiovascular disorders. Read more…

Mo Shi Zi (Oak Gallnuts)

Mo Shi Zi (Oak Gallnuts)

The Oak Tree has a long and powerful history. Used for its wood, acorns, leaves, bark and the spirit of the tree itself. These majestic trees can grow to be hundreds of hundreds of years old. The tree is held to be sacred by many cultures with its nuts, leaves, galls and bark providing medicinal healing and nutritive properties. Read more…

Mo Yao (Myrrh)

Mo Yao (Myrrh)

Myrrh has a long history as a perfume and incense with strong medicinal healing powers. It is known to invigorate blood, prevent gum disease and alleviate pain. As a sacred incense it is known to cleanse and uplift the spirit, opening the mind and heart to all things transcendental and divine. Read more…

Mu (Clover)

Mu (Clover)

Red Clover’s sweet flavor and medicinal properties make it a wonderful ingredient for teas. A member of the bean family, Red Clover is used as a tonic in Chinese Medicine to treat colds and flu. Clover is very good at treating chronic and degenerative ailments. Read more…

Oak

Mu Li (Oyster Shell)

Oyster shells are often mistakenly suggested or thought of as a supplemental source for calcium. While the shells are excellent for treating anxiety, insomnia, migraines, strokes, and palpitations among other conditions, they are not recommended for calcium supplementation as the body does not easily absorb calcium in this form. Oysters themselves are an excellent source of calcium and good for detoxing the liver, nourishing the skin and improving a person’s sex drive. The crushed shells have long been used as a medicine in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat a wide variety of disorders from anxiety to vaginal discharge and nocturnal emissions. In many cultures the shells are identified and used in funeral rites and burial locations. Read more…

Mu Dan Pi (Tree Peony)

Mu Dan Pi (Tree Peony)

Tree Peony is grown throughout the world as an ornamental tree and flower and for its medicinal properties. A symbol of honor and wealth the bark is famous for cooling blood, stopping nose bleeds due to high fevers, easing headaches and healing bruises due to injuries. Due to over-harvesting the wild plant is threatened with extinction. Read more…

Ashwagandha (Nan Fei Zui Jia)

Nan Fei Zui Jia (Ashwagandha)

Ashwagandha (AKA Winter Cherry) is considered the “ginseng” of Indian Ayurvedic medicine. It is a powerful antioxidant, adaptogen and anti-inflammatory. It increases physical energy, immunity and fertility and is the most popular herb used in Ayurvedic medicine. Read more…

Nan Gu (Pumpkin)

Nan Gu (Pumpkin)

Pumpkins and pumpkin seeds are both high in zinc and vitamin A making them a wonderful food and herb to help support menses, strengthen the prostrate, and aid fertility. They can also help treat urinary tract infections and support the kidneys. Read more…

Nan Gu Pi (Pumpkin Seeds)

Nan Gu Pi (Pumpkin Seeds)

Pumpkins and pumpkin seeds are both high in zinc and vitamin A making them a wonderful food and herb to help support menses, strengthen the prostrate, and aid fertility. They can also help treat urinary tract infections and support the kidneys. Read more…

Ning Meng (Lemon)

Ning Meng (Lemon)

Lemons have been used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world. They have been used medicinally, cosmetically, to detox and even to charge simple batteries. Read more…

Licorice

Ning Meng Ma Bian Cao (Lemon Verbena)

Used internally and externally, lemon verbena is a wonderfully minty-citrus scented and flavored herb known for treating joint pain and staph infections of the skin. It is soothing and can help you sleep better. It is considered the strongest lemon scented plant of all the lemon plants. It’s essential oil is an effective anti-inflammatory and highly effective for treating depression, anxiety and exhaustion. Read more…

Niu Bang Zi (Burdock)

Niu Bang Zi (Burdock)

Burdock is primarily respected for its blood cleansing and skin healing abilities. In the West the root is very popular medicinally and in the East (TCM) the fruit/seed is mostly used. In Asia it is a popular food and in the West it has been parboiled and added to artichoke dishes which also tastes like when cooked this way. Read more…

Chinese Water Lily (Lian Zi Xin, He Ye, Lian)

Pi Pa / Pi Pa Ye (Chinese Plum Tree / Loquat)

The Chinese plum, or loquat, is best known for being made into cough syrups to ease sore throats and coughing associated with bronchitis. It is also used to ease stomach aches. If the fruit is eaten in quantities it is known to have sedating properties helping you to fall asleep. The leaves are used to help prevent vomiting and are used externally to treat acne and eczema.
Read more…

Pi Jiu Hua (Hops)

Pi Jiu Hua (Hops)

Besides beer, hops are best known for aiding sleep and being mildly sedating. Read more…

Apple (Ping Guo)

Ping Guo (Apple)

The apple tree is perhaps the first tree to ever be cultivated. It is an excellent source of fiber and vitamin C. The nutrients of apples, are significantly higher in their skins, so be sure when you are eating an apple to eat their skin too! Read more…

Pu Gong Ying (Dandelion)

Pu Gong Ying (Dandelion)

Dandelion is probably one of the richest herbal sources of Vitamin K which aids bone mass and helps treat Alzheimer’s disease by limiting neuronal damage in the brain. Dandelion is an excellent general tonic for blood, skin and digestion. Read more…

Pu Huang (Cattail)

Pu Huang (Cattail)

Cattails are a medicine and a food. The pollen is most frequently used as a wonderful herb to stop internal and external bleeding. Used for centuries by the Chinese and Native Americans cattails have been used as stuffing for pillows, to stop postpartum bleeding and as a vegetable in stews and salads. The pollen is high in protein. The plants help regulate the cardiovascular system, by preventing clotting and lowering blood lipids. Read more…

Horseradish

Qi Ye Shu (Horse Chestnut)

Horse chestnut is a traditional remedy for leg vein health. It tones and protects blood vessels. It is used in small doses due to potentially poisonous active compounds that can be removed by proper processing. Never eat the nuts raw as this can cause death. Read more…

Qiaokeli (Cacao)

Qiaokeli (Cacao)

Daily consumption of dark chocolate will lower blood pressure by two to three points. Sprinkling cacao powder on your oatmeal helps your gut produce important microbes that aid the overall medicinal values of cacao. The darker the chocolate the more flavonoids and flavanols it contains. Read more…

Qin Cai (Celery)

Qin Cai (Celery)

Celery stimulates the nervous system and mineralizes the body. Because celery is both a diuretic and depurative it makes it a perfect ingredient for weight-loss programs. 3 glasses of celery juice a day is excellent for treating rheumatism, allergies, stomach disorders, detoxifing, and as an all-round aphrodisiac. Celery has an alkalizing effect on the body, which can help counteract the degenerative effects of the too acid diet many eat today. Read more…

Qin Jia (Gentian)

Qin Jia (Gentian)

There are many varieties of gentian. In the west, the most commonly used species is yellow gentian (yellow Gentiana). The other varieties have similar properties so they can, and are, also used depending on what is available. There is no better stomach tonic than gentian and it is considered extremely useful in treating jaundice. The Chinese make use of two different species of gentian: Gentiana scabra (Long Dan Cao) and G. macrophylla (Qin Jiao) attributing them with slightly different characteristics. In the west Yellow, Japanese, Autumn, Field, Marsh, Spring, Cross-Leaved and Five-Leaved Gentian are all commonly used interchangeably as they all have similar characteristics. Read more…

Ash Tree (Qin Pi)

Qin Pi (Ash Tree)

The ash tree is an important European and Chinese herb. It has a long history associating it with magic, spirits and medicinal healing. A bitter, astringent herb it is known for treating gout, arthritis, intermittent fevers, urinary tract infections and diarrhea. Ash trees attract lightning, so don’t stand under one during an electric storm. Ash is considered to be the sacred World Tree to the Norse, Druid and Celtic peoples. Note: Ash, Northern prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum), and Southern prickly ash (Fagara Clava-Herculis) are three distinct plants! Read more…

Qing Hao (Mugwort)

Qing Hao (Mugwort)

Mugwort has long been used as a healing herb that is used both internally and externally. As “moxa” the herb is burned and passed over the portion or area of the body needing to be healed or tonified. Read more…

Lime (Qing Ning)

Qing Ning (Lime)

Only 11 calories per the juice of one lime and you will get 22% of your daily minimum requirement of vitamin C. Limes reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease. They are antimicrobial. In West Africa, the addition of lime juice to the main meal of the day has proven to help prevent cholera outbreaks. Limes also contain constituents that are anticarcinogenic. Read more…

Qing Pi (Orange Peel)

Qing Pi (Orange Peel)

Oranges bring good luck, are loaded with Vitamin C and the peels are super high in nutrients. There are many different varietals of orange peel, but all of them help build and move Qi (Energy) in the body. They are a powerful and tasty herb often used in combination with other herbs to improve the overall taste of herbal remedies and lend strength to the formula. Read more…

Qu Mai (Carnation)

Qu Mai (Carnation)

Famous as a symbol of Mother’s Day, carnations are also commonly used in teas to help alleviate stress, depression and nervousness. The flowers have been being cultivated for over 2,000 years. Carnations are the national flower of Spain, Monaco and Slovenia. They are edible and wonderful in teas and infusions. Carnations have long been popular for treating stress and urinary tract infections. Read more…

Quail Grass/Celosia (Qing Xiang Zi)

Qing Xiang Zi (Quail Grass/Celosia)

Known by several names (including: Quail Grass, Cockscombs, Velvet Flower, Logos Spinach and Celosia), this common ornamental plant is edible and its seeds make a wonderful medicine for treating the eyes and high blood pressure. The Chinese have used the seeds as a commonly used medicine for centuries and the plant’s leaves and young stems are well known throughout Asia and Africa as a wonderful vegetable for soups and stews. Read more…

Quan Xie (Scorpion)

Quan Xie (Scorpion)

There are over 100 scorpion-based herbal formulas in Chinese Medicine. Modern studies have proved that Scorpions contain 17 amino acids and 14 trace elements that are essential to the human body, making it not only a medicinal substance but a nutritious food as well. Scorpion stings are painful, but usually harmless. Only 25 species are deadly. An image of evil, and a protector against evil, the scorpion is viewed by many cultures as an ancient healer and a cause of death. Read more…

Rou Dou Kou (Nutmeg)

Rou Dou Kou (Nutmeg)

Famous for soothing the stomach and aiding digestion, nutmeg is a wonderful spice and medicine. It can stop bad breath, ease the pain of arthritis and increase appetite. It is a wonderful addition to herbal remedies for its flavor enhancing properties, soothing effects on digestion and calming action. Read more…

Cinnamon (Rou Gui)

Rou Gui (Cinnamon)

Cinnamon has a history as a spice, a preserver of food, a medicine, an incense and a gift considered worthy of the gods. In China, it is used successfully to treat many ailments due to Cold or Wind Cold invasion or Stagnation. If you are suffering from Hot above and Cold below conditions, Cinnamon is the best herb for you. Read more…

Ru Xiang (Frankincense)

Ru Xiang (Frankincense)

Frankincense has long been used by many cultures to open the mind and soul to the eternal and to god. It has been used in cosmetics, perfumes, and to treat leprosy. The Chinese use it to help heal injuries and pain due to Blood or Qi stasis, including postpartum abdominal pain due to Blood stagnation. Read more…

Sang Bai Pi (Mulberry Bark)

Sang Bai Pi (Mulberry Bark)

White Mulberry has been a source of food for silkworms, a medicine, and a sweetener. Associated with the Tao and other sacred traditions this tree is often planted in sacred gardens or as a symbol of cosmic order and replenishment. The berries are a wonderful herb for nourishing blood. Read more…

Praying Mantis (Sang Piao Xiao)

Sang Piao Xiao (Praying Mantis)

Praying mantis egg cases have been used for thousands of years in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat frequent urination and are especially favored for being the best herb to treat bed-wetting in young children. The egg cases are not typically used as a medicine in the West. The insects are a popular organic and non-pesticide tool for preventing pests in your garden. Read more…

Sang Shen (Berry/Fruit)

Sang Shen (Berry/Fruit)

White Mulberry has been a source of food for silkworms, a medicine, and a sweetener. Associated with the Tao and other sacred traditions this tree is often planted in sacred gardens or as a symbol of cosmic order and replenishment. The berries are a wonderful herb for nourishing blood. Read more…

Sang Ye (Leaves)

Sang Ye (Leaves)

White Mulberry has been a source of food for silkworms, a medicine, and a sweetener. Associated with the Tao and other sacred traditions this tree is often planted in sacred gardens or as a symbol of cosmic order and replenishment. The berries are a wonderful herb for nourishing blood. Read more…

See Bo He (Peppermint)

See Bo He (Peppermint)

Cool, warm and refreshing this herbs history dates back as far as 10,000 years ago. Used as food, a drink, an essential oil and a medicine. Read more…

Arnica (Shan Jin Che)

Shan Jin Che (Arnica)

Arnica is a toxic herb, but can be ingested in highly diluted form in homeopathic remedies, where it is used to ease pain and inflammation. Typically it is used topically and is considered one of the best herbs for helping to heal bruises fast. Arnica does this by helping to mobilize white blood cells to cleanup and repair wounds faster. Arnica is especially recommended for pain derived from trauma (injuries) or inflammation (such as arthritis). Read more…

Shan Yao (Chinese Yams)

Shan Yao (Chinese Yams)

Called “fairy food” in China for its congenital and tonic abilities, it is often cut into thick slices and cooked in stews. Used safely by all ages, it is especially noted for improving male and female fertility, aiding digestion and stopping coughs. Read more…

Shan Zha (Hawthorn)

Shan Zha (Hawthorn)

The leaves and berries of the Hawthorn are edible, the leaves when young are used in salads and the berries are made into jams and jellies. This popular garden ornamental plant has long been known for it’s ability to treat many ailments of the heart and circulatory system. Read more…

Poke (Shang Lu)

Shang Lu (Poke)

American Poke has a long history as a food and herbal remedy considered excellent at relieving toxicities. In China, its use dates back to over 2,000 years where it has been used to treat edemas and especially breast tumors, lumps and mastitis. It is a potent herb that if used correctly can treat lumps and tumors but if used improperly can cause nausea, vomiting and death. Read more…

Snakeskin (She Tui)

She Tui (Snakeskin)

Snakeskin is documented as being used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as far back as 100 A.D. It was likely used long before that as it was considered good for treating skin eruptions, eye infections, sore throats and hemorrhoids. Read more…

Sheng Jiang (Ginger)

Sheng Jiang (Ginger)

Ginger produces a hot, fragrant spice that has been used in candy, foods, medicines, teas, beverages and wines. It is used in cooking the world over for its flavor, and ability to detox food. It is a well known cure for motion sickness of all kinds and has a long worldwide history of medicinal use. Read more…

Shenreg (Sage)

Shenreg (Sage)

Sage has been considered one of the top medicinal and culinary herbs for centuries. It is easy to cultivate and has spirit cleansing properties. This herb is a mainstay in many herbal gardens. Read more…

Shepherd’s Purse (Shepherd’s Purse)

Shepherd’s Purse (Shepherd’s Purse)

Shepherd’s Purse is famous for its ability to stop bleeding, especially in the uterus. It is used to heal wounds, bleeding from any internal organ for any reason, heavy menstrual bleeding for any reason from fibroids to endometriosis, to post trauma from surgery to the uterus. In China the leaves are a popular ingredient in dumplings and the herb is used to “brighten eyes.” Read more…

Deer Horn Velvet (Lu Rong)

Shi Hu (Dendrobium)

Dendrobium (orchids) build reproductive and physical stamina in both men and women. They are famous as being a Taoist tonic herb used to promote longevity and build strong muscles. The Aztecs mixed vanilla orchids and chocolate to give themselves power and strength. Read more…

Arnica (Shan Jin Che)

Shi Jue Ming (Abalone Shell)

Abalone is most often thought of as a delicious seafood in the West. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, it is also recognized for its ability to treat a wide variety of eye disorders, including glaucoma, conjunctivitis, night blindness and cataracts. The shell is also known to help calm anxiety and sooth headaches caused by what the Chinese call excessive Liver Heat. Read more…

Pomegranate (Shi Liu)

Shi Liu (Pomegranate)

Pomegranates are moderate in calories and an excellent source of dietary fibers. They are considered a “super fruit” because of their important nutritional value and antioxidant properties. Regular consumption of pomegranate juice has been found to be effective against diabetes, lymphoma, and BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Pomegranates are a worldwide and ancient symbol of fertility and prosperity. The Spanish introduced the fruit to the Caribbean and Americas. Their leaves and flowers are used to treat burns. Read more…

Thyme

Shu Gu Jiang Huang (Temulawak / Java Ginger)

Temulawak / Java Ginger (Shu Gu Jiang Huang), aka Java turmeric, is used to treat indigestion, stomach disorders, and liver and gallbladder complaints. Along with turmeric, it is in the ginger family of plants. Don’t confuse Java turmeric (aka temulawak/Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.) with turmeric (Curcuma longa) which is best known for its anti-inflammatory properties. Both contain the constituent curcumin but Java turmeric also contains xanthorrhizol, a constituent known for supporting the production of bile. Read more…

Shui Shan (Redwood)

Shui Shan (Redwood)

The American writer John Steinbeck said, “The redwoods, once seen, leave a mark or create a vision that stays with you always. No one has ever successfully painted or photographed a redwood tree. The feeling they produce is not transferable. From them comes silence and awe.” Read more…

Pine (Song)

Song (Pine)

Pine bark, needles and the essential oil derived from the plants resins are used to clean houses, clear unwanted spirits, prevent cancer, help digestion and even as an herbal viagra. More research is being done to confirm the plant’s benefits and functions. Pines are cultivated for Christmas trees and their scent is calming and cleansing. Read more…

Pinon (Song Zi Ren)

Song Zi Ren (Pinon)

Pinon (Pinon edulis), or the pinon pine, is native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. All species of pinon trees produce edible seeds, but only the North American pinon produces seeds large enough to be a major source of food. This tree’s (Pinon edulis) nuts are highly nutritious and were a staple of the Native Americans. The nuts are still enjoyed in pesto sauces, salads, main dishes and as a snack foods. The resin (also called trementina) is sacred and used in healing and religious ceremonies. Species of pine nuts can also be found in, Spain, Korea and China. Pine needles and their essential oils, are also used as a medicine to treat coughs and bronchitis. Read more…

Spirulina

Spirulina

Blue-green algae / Spirulina changed our Earth forever by their photosynthetic activity that brought the needed oxygen into the environment so new and more-complex organisms, plants and mammals could evolve. It is a highly nutritious food that is loaded with proteins, minerals and vitamins. Read more…

Milk Thistle

Su Mi (Millet)

Millet is a gluten-free grain that is loaded with important nutrition. In China, it was used by Chairman Mao and the Red Army to sustain themselves during their campaigns against the Kuomintang. It has nourished peoples in parts of China for over 8,000 years. Unlike rice, millet does not have to be refined before eating Read more…

Tai (Moss)

Tai (Moss)

Being highly absorbent and soft, with some antibacterial properties, mosses have long been used to help treat wounds. These same qualities have also led to their being used as insulation in clothing and shoes. In Finland, peat moss has been used to make bread during times of famine. Read more…

Tan Xiang (Sandalwood)

Tan Xiang (Sandalwood)

The tree’s heartwood is considered scared in the Vedic tradition. Sandalwood promotes deep relaxed states that increase the flow of spiritual energy. It relaxes the throat and heart chakras. It is used to treat depression, urinary infections, poor appetite and bronchitis. The herbs strong bitter taste and anti-inflammatory properties make it an excellent cold remedy. Arabic texts from the 10th century say sandalwood “clears headaches due to heat.” In Ancient China, it was recommended to treat cholera because of its cooling and drying properties. Sandalwood is a unique herb able to treat and balance the body, mind and spirit. Read more…

Sugar (Tang)

Tang (Sugar)

Sugar was originally imported to Europe to be used as a medicine. Today the average person is said to consume about 53 lbs. of sugar a year, or the equivalent of 260 food calories per person per day. Sugar is used as a preservative and sweetener in many processed foods and beverages. Numerous studies continue to be undertaken to help clarify the role sugar, and too much sugar, can play in the body. To date, it is known that too much sugar leads to heart disease, diabetes, obesity, inflammation, tooth decay, dementia, hyperactivity and a host of other related ailments and conditions. Read more…

Peach (Tao Zi)

Tao Zi (Peach)

Peach fruit is enjoyed in the West, but in China, the pits are also used as an important medicine for treating conditions caused by blood stagnation. In China, peaches are associated with longevity and vitality. In the West the fruit is known for its heart healthy and antioxidant properties. Read more…

Tian Men Dong (Wild Asparagus Root)

Tian Men Dong (Wild Asparagus Root)

Wild Asparagus Root, Tian Men Dong, is called Shatavri (“She who has a thousand husbands”) in India. It is a tonic for the lungs, heart and spirit, promoting compassion and love. It is used by both men and woman but is especially used by woman to aid female disorders from PMS to menopause to sexual dysfunction. It is often eaten raw. The best qualify is considered to be soft, chewy and sweet like a jelly bean. Read more…

Bearberry / Uva Ursi (Xiong Guo)

Tian Cai (Beet)

Beets and their leafy greens are enjoyed worldwide for their wonderful flavor and nutritional value. High in folate they are especially important to eat during pregnancy, as folate is critical for normal tissue growth. They help improve the flow of blood to the brain slowing dementia and improving mental faculties. Studies show they help protect against colon cancer and other types of tumors. Read more…

Tian Shu Kui (Geranium)

Tian Shu Kui (Geranium)

There are many varietals of geranium. Beyond being a lovely garden flower the many varieties exhibit similar healing properties and the leaves and flowers of rose geraniums can also be used in the kitchen as a culinary herb. (NOT all geraniums are edible, but the rose geranium is one that is!) Read more…

Hemlock (Tieshan)

Tieshan (Hemlock)

EXTREME caution advised. Hemlock is a seriously poisonous plant. Ingestion can be lethal. Often mistaken for other plants, it is critical for Western Hemlock to be correctly identified. In China, it is not the poisonous flower that is available but the conifer tree that is grown for it’s foliage and is considered safe and non-poisonous. Read more…

Elderberry

Tu Mu Xiang, Xuan Fu Hua, Jin Fei Cao (Elecampane)

Elecampane has been considered a cure-all and particularly useful herb since ancient Greek and Roman times for treating common colds, menstrual disorders, digestive upsets, and dropsy. It is especially regarded as a tonic herb for the respiratory system by European, Chinese, and Ayurvedic medicines. It effectively treats chronic bronchitis, bronchial asthma, colds with copious clear or white mucus, and irritating coughs (especially in children). It also supports digestion and helps build immunity. Read more…

Wu Bei Zi (Sumac Gallnuts)

Wu Bei Zi (Sumac Gallnuts)

The Oak Tree has a long and powerful history. Used for its wood, acorns, leaves, bark and the spirit of the tree itself. These majestic trees can grow to be hundreds of hundreds of years old. The tree is held to be sacred by many cultures with its nuts, leaves, galls and bark providing medicinal healing and nutritive properties. Read more…

Centipede (Wu Gong)

Wu Gong (Centipede)

Centipedes are considered a pest in the West, but in China, they are also a food and a powerful medicine. They are considered to be an important anticancer and anti-tuberculosis medicine and blood moving herb. They are successfully used to treat tremors, seizures, hemiplegia due to stroke, tetanus and snake bites. Read more…

Fig (Wu Hua Guo)

Wu Hua Guo (Fig)

Unlike most fruits, dried figs contain more nutritional value than fresh figs, though both are highly nutritious and good for you. Certain compounds in figs are known to be toxic to human cancer cells, making figs a good anticancer food. They are rich in antioxidants helping to keep you healthy and slow the effects of aging. Fig leaves are also useful for treating diabetes, skin cancer, fighting wrinkles caused by aging, and lowering cholesterol.Traditional Chinese Medicine considered figs to be a Yin and Yang balancing food. Read more…

Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra)

Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra)

Schisandra is considered one of the great longevity tonic herbs. It is famous as an adaptogen, building stamina and as an anti-aging herb. It is also known to impart beauty and sexual endurance to those who use it regularly. Read more…

Tomato (Xi Hong Shi)

Xi Hong Shi (Tomato)

Tomatoes are the best dietary source for lycopenes. This constituent is famous for helping to prevent heart disease and prostate cancer in men. Tomatoes also provide 33% of your minimum daily requirement of Vitamin C. They are a symbol for the sun and good health. Read more…

Arnica (Shan Jin Che)

Xian He Cao (Agrimony)

Agrimony is an ancient herb used worldwide for purifying the blood, healing wounds, and treating urinary tract infections. It has been used on battlefields to stop bleeding and hasten the healing of traumatic wounds. Its overall tonifying and immune enhancing qualities help make it a good “cure all” herb. It can be used to improve digestion, support kidney, liver and heart function as well as support digestion. Read more…

Amaranth (Xian Shi)

Xian Shi (Amaranth)

Amaranth was already being cultivated by the Aztecs 8,000 years ago. Its ancient history is traced back to Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula. It is the only grain with a documented vitamin C content and is gluten-free. In Mexico, a sweet is made from popped amaranth that is mixed with sugar or honey called “dulce de alegria” or “sweet delight.” They are shaped into small skulls and given on the “Day of the Dead” celebration on October 31 and November 1 of each year. Read more…

Xiang Bin Jiu (Champagne)

Xiang Bin Jiu (Champagne)

Champagne is for celebrating but it is also a medicine! It is full of antioxidants and polyphenols that help prevent heart attacks, strokes and lower pressure. New studies are also showing that in small amounts, a small glass per night, it can aid short term memory loss and certain other cognitive functions! So enjoy a few bubbles, relax and have some fun! Happy New Year! Read more…

Licorice

Xiang Mao (Lemongrass)

Lemongrass has a long history as a culinary and medicinal herb. Both the leaves and the plant’s essential oil are popular forms for treating a wide variety of ailments ranging from heart ailments, to skin problems, to convulsions, to cancer, to menstrual cramps, to acne, to depression. A powerfully healing herb that is wonderful to cook with and easy to grow in your garden to chase away mosquitoes and attract bees. Enjoy lemongrass. Read more…

Sunflower (Xiang Ri Kui)

Xiang Ri Kui (Sunflower)

While the Chinese cultivate sunflowers for food, they do not typically use it medicinally, but it is used as a medicine and food in the West. The seeds are highly nutritious and sunflower oil is said to be the closest alternative to olive oil and can be used as an olive oil substitute. Read more…

Xiang Shi (Oak Acorn)

Xiang Shi (Oak Acorn)

The Oak Tree has a long and powerful history. Used for its wood, acorns, leaves, bark and the spirit of the tree itself. These majestic trees can grow to be hundreds of hundreds of years old. The tree is held to be sacred by many cultures with its nuts, leaves, galls and bark providing medicinal healing and nutritive properties. Read more…

Xiao Hui Xiang (Fennel)

Xiao Hui Xiang (Fennel)

With edible leaves, bulbs, seeds and fruit, fennel has a long culinary and medicinal history. Wildly cultivated this herb is also now found naturalized and growing wild in many place of the world. Read more…

Eyebright (Xiao Mi Cao)

Xiao Mi Cao (Eyebright)

Eyebright has a long history for being used to treat eye disorders. It is famous for treating even severe inflammation of the eyes. It reduces inflammation, conjunctivitis, and can be used as an eye wash, drops or as an infusion for internal use to treat eye problems. Eyebright is also used to treat sinusitis and help heal wounds. It can also help treat skin problems such as acne and stretch marks. Eyebright is primarily used as a poultice and wash, but it can be taken internally in teas and tincture. Read more…

Valerian (Xie Cao)

Xie Cao (Valerian)

Valerian has been used as a medicinal plant since ancient Greek and Roman times. The herb has been used for over 2000 years. It is most frequently used as a sleep aid. Some people use it to withdraw from using pharmaceutical sleeping pills. The herb is also used to calm anxiety and hysteria. Adding valerian to your bath water can help with restlessness and anxiety. The Chinese have also used the herb to heal injuries and treat menses as they define the herb as being able to also ease pain and stop bleeding. Read more…

Xin Yi (Magnolia Flower)

Xin Yi (Magnolia Flower)

Magnolia flowers and buds have a long tradition in Chinese Medicine for treating nasal congestion, whitening skin and calming toothaches. Read more…

Apricot/Apricot Kernel (Xing, Xing Ren)

Xing, Xing Ren (Apricot/Apricot Kernel)

Originally from China, apricots are now found worldwide. Considered one of the healthiest fruits in the world, it is loaded with nutritional, health and medicinal value. “An apricot a day, can also help keep the doctor away.” Apricots are packed with Vitamins A and C, minerals, fiber and antioxidants that support eye, skin, heart and digestive health. Apricots are low in calories and help regulate blood sugar levels. The Chinese have used the kernels for thousands of years to treat lung disorders and constipation. Read more…

Wheat (Xiao Mai)

Xiao Mai (Wheat)

Wheat includes two key components: wheat germ and wheat bran. Both are extremely high in nutritional value. Wheat based products include bread, pasta, semolina, bulgur and couscous. The grain has become controversial because of the protein gluten, which can trigger a harmful immune response in predisposed individuals. Wheat is a rich source of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and fiber. Wheat feeds an estimated one third of the world’s population. Read more…

Xiong Guo (Bearberry / Uva Ursi)

Xiong Guo (Bearberry / Uva Ursi)

Bearberry, also known as uva ursi, is most frequently used by Chinese, European and Native American’s to treat urinary tract disorders. Until the discovery of sulfa and antibiotics, bearberry was the treatment of choice for treating bladder, kidney and related infections. The name bearberry comes from the fact that bears love to eat the berries. This herb also helps keep the pH balance of urine from being too acidic. It has a sedating effect on bladder walls and is considered the best at treating chronic inflammation of the bladder or kidneys. Bearberry is also considered a visionary herb that helps those seeking increased psychic ability. Read more…

Plantain (Che Qian Zi)

Xiong Moyan Gen (Pleurisy Root)

Considered one of the best herbal expectorants available, pleurisy root has a long history of use by the American Indians prior to its discovery by early U.S. medical botanists. It is excellent for treating chest complaints, difficulty breathing, consumption, pneumonia, and is also good for treating diarrhea and dysentery. Read more…

Horseradish

Xiu Qiu, Chang Shan (Hydrangea)

Hydrangea is a popular ornamental plant in many gardens. The plant’s roots and rhizomes are used as medicine in the West and Asia for treating the kidneys, prostate, wounds and bladder. The plant increases the body’s use of calcium, lowering the risk of kidney stones. The roots are also becoming well-known for their ability to fight autoimmune diseases. In China, another separate plant related to the hydrangea, Dichroa febrifuga, is also used as a medicine and is famous for being an outstanding herb for treating malaria. Read more…

Meadowsweet (Xiu Xian Ju)

Xiu Xian Ju (Meadowsweet)

Meadowsweet is a common and beloved wild flower. It is popular as a cure for diarrhea, especially in children, general aches, fever, stomach disorders and headaches. Bayer Pharmaceuticals used the dried leaves of the plant as its original source for salicylic acid used to treat pain and headaches. Meadowsweet is gentle on the stomach. Read more…

Figwort/Scrophula (Xuan Shen)

Xuan Shen (Figwort/Scrophula)

The botanical name for figwort, Scrophularia, comes from scrofula, a form of tuberculosis that the herb is famous for treating. It is a mild herb best known for its ability to clear toxicities in the lymph and skin. It dissolves swellings and tumors of all kinds, including scrofula. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the herb is used to hemorrhoids, psoriasis, ulcers and other skin fungal infections. It can stimulate the uterus, regulate menses, and release a retained placenta. Figwort is an excellent example of an herb that promotes cleansing not through elimination but through actually cleansing the blood, tissues, lymph and skin. It is an excellent cleanser for the glands. Read more…

Xue Song (Cedar)

Xue Song (Cedar)

Cedar has been a revered plant by many cultures throughout history. It is burnt for sacred ceremonies, cleansing energies, healing the lungs as well as used to make teas and infusions to treat a wide variety of ailments. The Cedars of God remain one of the last vestiges of the extensive forests of the Cedars of Lebanon that thrived in ancient times. Read more…

Xun Ma (Nettle)

Xun Ma (Nettle)

Nettles have been used for food, medicine and even to make fabric from. They are famous for being able to relieve almost all symptoms caused by allergies: itchy, watery eyes, sneezing, running nose, and nasal inflammation. The herb’s tonic properties are considered to be anti-aging and help purify the blood. Nettle’s fibers have been used by many cultures, ancient and modern, to make cloth. Nettles also help break curses and spells. Read more…

Lavender (Xun Yi Cao)

Xun Yi Cao (Lavender)

Cupcakes, teas, soaps, and scents all benefit from lavender. Lavender has been used for centuries to cure headaches, calm the spirit, sooth throats and help acne. The Pilgrims brought lavender with them to America as one of their main healing medicines. Read more…

Ya Luo (Yarrow)

Ya Luo (Yarrow)

Yarrow has often been used in divination and spells. It is a powerfully protective herb and famous for helping to heal wounds and treat influenza. It has a long tradition in European, Native American and Chinese medicine. Yarrow helps treat toothaches, fevers, digestive issues, ulcers, lowers blood pressure and much, much more. Read more…

Salt (Yan)

Yan (Salt)

Salt is essential for life. It is one of the basic human tastes and makes up 0.4% of your total bodies weight. Salt plays a key role in the body as an electrolyte (aiding nerves and muscles to function properly) and as an osmotic solute (helping maintain the proper balance of fluids in the body). Too much salt can increase the chance of cardiovascular disease. Salt is one of the five herbal flavors in Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is identified with helping the body to dissolve stagnation. Read more…

Yan Mai (Oat)

Yan Mai (Oat)

While Oats were most probably brought north by the Romans, it is in the North that we can recognize the plants gifts. Oats build extremely robust constitutions: consider the North’s extreme climatic and historical conditions (cold, damp, wind, plague, famine). Oatmeal porridge (from the meal not the flakes) was the mainstay food in the Middle Ages for most peasants. Oats feed your soul, your body, and your mind. Read more…

Artichoke (Yang Ji)

Yang Ji (Artichoke)

The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus) is not to be confused with the Jerusalem artichokes (Helianthus tuberosus) which are also called sunchokes and are actually sunflower roots, or Chinese artichokes (Stachys affinis also commonly called crosne or knotroot). Globe artichoke is a highly nutritious food, famous for its antioxidant and dietary fiber content. The leaves are commonly made into extracts used to stimulate the flow of bile from the liver which helps relieve heartburn and alcohol “hangovers.” Artichokes are an excellent liver tonifying food and medicine. Read more…

Bayberry (Yang Mei)

Yang Mei (Bayberry)

There are several species of bay trees whose leaves are used as medicines and as culinary herbs. They all have similar aromatic properties, but the Indian Bay tastes more like cinnamon though milder, and the California Bay is considered to have the strongest flavor. Read more…

Yao Shu Kui (Marshmallow)

Yao Shu Kui (Marshmallow)

Marshmallow is a wonderful plant for treating both hot dry and hot damp acute conditions. The plant is famous for its moistening properties. Marshmallow is also used to coat sore throats, treat irritated hot bladder infections and lubricate hot achy joint pain. Don’t confuse it with blue mallow, a similar plant but different species that is mostly used externally. Marshmallow is not the candied marshmallows used in desserts, but it can be boiled and eaten as a vegetable. Read more…

Coconut (Ye Zi)

Ye Zi (Coconut)

Coconut, coconut milk, water, cream, oil and butter are all highly nutritious, rich in fiber and delicious. The fruit is made up of its shell, kernel (meat) and water. A medium-sized coconut can provide almost all the daily-required essential minerals, vitamins and energy a person needs. Coconuts are full of lauric acid, the important saturated fatty acid that increases good-HDL that helps regulate cholesterol levels in blood. Coconuts are also a good source of potassium and electrolytes. Lactose free, it is an excellent substitute for anyone allergic to dairy or nut or grain-based milks. Read more…

Yerba Mansa (Yerba Mansa)

Yerba Mansa (Yerba Mansa)

Growing yerba mansa near your house protects you from evil spirits. The herb has a very low level of toxicity making it a useful herb for treating many conditions. It has been compared to the herb goldenseal as it has similar uses, though yerba mansa is considered safer to use and it has a different chemical makeup. Traditionally the herb is uses to treat colds and flus. To this day many local curanderas (Mexican traditional healers) include yerba mansa in their healing formulas. The plant is often said to have magical qualities that provide protection and give strength to the body, mind and spirit.
Read more…

Yew (Hong Dou Shan)

Yi Lan Yi Lan (Ylang Ylang)

Ylang ylang is an essential oil extracted from the flowers of the Cananga tree native to the forests of Indonesia and the Philippines. The oil has been shown in studies to lower blood pressure, reduce tension, and increase attentiveness. It aids sleep and helps clear up skin conditions such as acne, bruises and wrinkles associated with aging. Read more…

Yi Mu Cao (Motherwort)

Yi Mu Cao (Motherwort)

Motherwort is the plant best known for treating female disorders, hence it’s name “Motherwort.” It treats conditions from pregnancy, to menses, to menopause. It is also famous for calming nerves and giving strength to the heart. Read more…

Yin (Silver)

Yin (Silver)

The history of silver being used as an ingredient for healing goes back to before the days of alchemy. Long recognized for its unique properties as a metal, it was unlikely history would overlook its possibilities to aid in Healing. What’s true and what is still questioned. Read more…

White Poplar (Bai Yang Zhi)

Ying Su Qiao (White Poppy)

The White Poppy (aka the Opium Poppy) has been used in Europe and the Far East for many thousands of years. There is no better sedating and hypnotic drug. It is best used to treat pain. The drugs Morphine, Thebaine, Noscapine, and Codeine are all made from the plant’s two principal alkaloids. Often forgotten are the plant’s other medicinal properties that include being an effective astringent, used to treat chronic diarrhea and dysentery. It is also known for its expectorant and antispasmodic abilities. Read more…

Turmeric (Yu Jin, Jiang Huang, E Zhu)

Yu Jin, Jiang Huang, E Zhu (Turmeric)

Turmeric stands alone for its exceptionally high margin of safety during its over 6,000 years use as a culinary spice in curry and medicinal herb. Turmeric is used most especially to treat heart disease, arthritis, Alzheimer’s, cancer, depression and chronic age-related diseases caused by inflammation. The Chinese use both White Javanese (C. zedoaria) and Yellow Indian turmeric (C. longa) medicinally. They also differentiate between Yellow Turmeric Root and the Rhizomes. Both have similar but distinct properties. Read more…

Yu Li Ren (Wild Cherry)

Yu Li Ren (Wild Cherry)

The Chinese use the cherry pits of Prunus japonica, which is in the same Rosaceae family as the Western Prunus serotina and P. avuim. Both the East and the West use the cherry tree’s pit but in different ways. The wild cherries and the bark are typically used in the West. Information on both herbs is included here. Read more…

Corn (Yu Mi)

Yu Mi (Corn)

Domesticated by the peoples of southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago, maize or corn has since been brought to many countries all over the world for cultivation. Native American Indians were cultivating the multi-colored flint (Indian) corn since 1,000 BC. Contemporary dent (yellow or white) corn was developed from these earlier native varietals. Corn is a soft-starchy food. Whole grain corn is a good source of many antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Corn is a staple food and one of the most popular cereal grains in the world. Traditional Chinese Medicine uses Corn Silk (Yu Mi Xu) to stop bleeding, lower blood pressure and detoxify. Read more…

Corn Silk (Yu Mi Xu)

Yu Mi Xu (Corn Silk)

Corn Silk has a long history of gently and thoroughly treating urinary complaints. The word “maize” derived from Mexican native languages meaning “mother” or “mother of life.” Corn Silk is also used to treat coronary heart problems as it lowers blood pressure and eases hypertension. It is native to Mexico and was spread throughout the Americas around 2500 years ago. It is considered by many native tribes to be a gift from the gods. Read more…

Yuan Hua (Lilac)

Yuan Hua (Lilac)

Lilacs are edible. They symbolize first love and are said to drive away ghosts. They have long been used in both the Eastern and Western healing traditions to fight fevers, treat coughs and calm the stomach. Lilacs are also used by the cosmetic industry for their aromatic and calming effects. Read more…

Yue Gui Shu Ye (Bay Leaf)

Yue Gui Shu Ye (Bay Leaf)

There are several species of bay trees whose leaves are used as medicines and as culinary herbs. They all have similar aromatic properties, but the Indian Bay tastes more like cinnamon though milder, and the California Bay is considered to have the strongest flavor. Read more…

Za Cao (Willowherb)

Za Cao (Willowherb)

Willowherb (also called Willow Herb) is not to be confused with the Willow Tree (also called Willow White). Willowherb is a lovely plant known mostly for being nutritious and edible, but it is also a good medicine for treating whooping cough and asthma. It is often used with the herb saw palmetto to treat prostrate problems. It is known for its ability to treat urinary tract infections, chronic diarrhea, intestinal irritations, and skin problems ranging from eczema, acne and burns to wounds and boils. The juice of the flowers is highly antiseptic and can be simply squeezed from the fresh petals. Read more…

Ze Xie (Alisma)

Ze Xie (Alisma)

Ancient Chinese texts indicate that alisma promotes an easy labor, fertility and stimulates the female sexual and generative organs. It is considered a pure Kidney tonic. Extracts are showing anticancer properties. Read more…

Periwinkle (Zhang Chun Hua)

Zhang Chun Hua (Periwinkle)

Both species of periwinkle (Vinca major, V. minor) and Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) are used for their astringent and tonic properties. Often associated with supporting “brain-health,” the plant is used to support memory and brain function in the elderly. It is also used to stop bleeding, and clear mucous from the throat and lungs. A beautiful flower, periwinkle has been associated with death, used as a medicine and as a magical ingredient in love potions and other spells. Read more…

Zhi Shi (Orange Peel)

Zhi Shi (Orange Peel)

Oranges bring good luck, are loaded with Vitamin C and the peels are super high in nutrients. There are many different varietals of orange peel, but all of them help build and move Qi (Energy) in the body. They are a powerful and tasty herb often used in combination with other herbs to improve the overall taste of herbal remedies and lend strength to the formula. Read more…

Bamboo (Zhu)

Zhu (Bamboo)

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the leaves of the bamboo plant are most commonly used medicinally. However, there are five parts of bamboo that are used and each has its own unique medicinal properties. They are bamboo shavings, dried sap, liquid sap, bland leaves and bitter leaves. While they can all overlap in function, they each have varying strengths and applications including the treatment of febrile diseases, depression and urinary dysfunction. Read more…

Cleavers (Zhu Yang Yang)

Zhu Yang Yang (Cleavers)

Cleavers are a valuable diuretic. It stimulates the lymphatic system and is often used to treat skin problems ranging from seborrhoea and eczema to psoriasis. The herb has also been used in both kidney and liver Spring tonics as a general blood cleanser and even as a cleansing tonic used during serious ailments such as cancer, especially if there is nodal involvement. Read more…

Gardenia (Zhi Zi)

Zhi Zi (Gardenia)

Gardenias are used to treat all forms of febrile diseases, hot reckless blood conditions, damp-heat jaundice, and conditions of damp-heat urinary obstruction. Gardenias are beautiful flowers grown the world over for their beauty and wonderful sweet scent. They can be used to calm nerves and ease stress. Read more…

Zi Hua di Ding (Violet (Pansy))

Zi Hua di Ding (Violet (Pansy))

While being a lovely gentle flower ,it is equally able to relieve heat, release toxins and resolve masses. As a food, a liquer and an herbal remedy this delicate plant is not to be overlooked. Read more…

Zi Zhu Hua (Echinacea)

Zi Zhu Hua (Echinacea)

While not native to China this plant has a long history in Western herbalism. History reveals a wide variety of usuages and applications. A special plant native to North America and used by the American Indians for a wide range of ailments, injuries, bites and infections. Read more…

Online Course Coming Soon!

Start learning today by downloading our FREE herbal fact sheets. Become a member, FREE, for access to all our herbal PDFs and for a special, Member’s Only offer!

ATTENTION: All material provided on this website is for informational or educational purposes only. It is not intended as a substitute for the advice of your healthcare professional or physician. Redistribution permitted with attribution. Be Healthy. Be Happy. Be Whole. Be Free.

ATENCIÓN: Todo el material proporcionado en este sitio web es sólo con fines informativos o educativos. No es sustituto del consejo de su profesional de la salud o médico. Esté sano. Sea feliz. Siéntase completo. Sea libre.

Health Break: Detox, Strengthen & Cleanse

Join our next 30-Day “Love Your Liver” Detox Challenge!

A Health Boost and Reset to Balance Body, Mind, & Spirit Using Traditional Chinese Medicine. You'll also recieve our Free Healing Herb Fact Sheets and latest news. Your privacy is guaranteed.

Thank you, you have joined our wait list! We'll let you know when our next 30-Day “Love Your Liver” Detox Challenge is open.

Healing Herb Fact Sheets

Download. Print. Share.

Complete the form below for immediate access to ALL our Herb Fact Sheets.

Thank you for joining us! Please check your email for details on how to access our free Healing Herb Fact Sheets. Be sure to check your spam folder and promotions tab if you have one.